Wednesday, March 25, 2009

I wonder why?

This webpage is currently blocked in China. (Usually it gets 'timed out' immediately; although it will occasionally display briefly before the data transfer is interrupted.)

It's been open to access for quite a long time now, and still was as recently as a month or two ago (I referred to it in writing this piece at the end of January).

The CCP goons are getting jittery about "the anniversary" really early this year, it seems...

10 comments:

Caren said...

You Tube just got blocked too. There's an article in today's NYTimes about it.

"Google said it doesn't know why but Xinhua said the supporters of the DL fabricated a video that appeared to show Chinese police officers brutally beating T*betians after riots last year."

Of course Xinhua didn't identify the video.

Lemme know if you want the link.

Froog said...

I have links, thanks. But they're blocked!

My view is that it would be far better to selectively block stuff (not that hard) or to leave it up and (if they must, and they feel they must) bombard the comment threads with "This is all FAKE, you don't know what Tibet is really like" stuff. Blanket blocks just piss people off and attract attention to the stuff they supposedly don't want people to notice. It's somewhere beyond STUPID. But that's your CCP goons for you.

Caren said...

Ugh. I forgot the censors are worse in BJ than ZZ. We very rarely had issues accessing the NYTimes. :(

Yeah, the whole "lets block everything" attitude just makes people want to see it even more.

Any chance of a Stateside visit this summer?

Froog said...

Hmm, I'm well overdue.... but the finances aren't going great at the moment. Working on a plan....

Real Fenqing said...

Hmm,T in WIKI.Normally,we call it "six-four event".The time that I first noticed that is probably around 98 in a book named "70 years of CCP"(a CCP propoganda material published in 91).In 2004,one of my friend accidentally downloaded a famous documentary "TAM square" and I remembered the heated atmosphere in our dorms that day.

However,I believe that even if one day,these webpages were not blocked,the huge quantity of "fenqing" would still remain its size with only a little drop.Today's "fenqing" overseas actually acquire the chance to read another theory,but they still choose to question its credibility and quickly put the famous label("western-anti-China conspirascy") on.And the worst situation,in my opinion,is that more and more "fenqing"(even ordinary people) start to accept a value system without compassion and humanity."It was worth killing all of them to achieve a 20-year stability.","China's economic miracle shows that CCP made a right decision in 89.".They call themselves "patriots".What kind of patriotism it is? Maybe the last refuge of these scoundrels.

Froog said...

You were a student in 'O4?? I might have taught you.

I try to take as balanced a view as I can of the '89 events. I appreciate that the disorder was a huge challenge to the government and to social stability, and that drastic action may have been necessary to end it. However, I feel that the whole handling of the affair was botched. Resorting to martial law was a desperate, extreme tactic in the first place; and the final implementation of it, and the clearing of T Square, seems to have been characterised by a lack of control. The troops had been so wound up by the propaganda messages being fed to them that some of them were shooting at anything, for no reason at all.

It is one of the most shameful things any nation can do to turn its troops against its own people. But perhaps even more shameful is to refuse to acknowledge that wrong. I really think China needs to initiate a big public discussion about the events of 20 years ago, and perhaps create something along the lines of the 'Truth and Reconciliation Commission' in South Africa - to examine the truth of what happened then and why, and to finally start exorcising some of those ghosts.

Kirby said...

I think that I was not one of your student,Froog:),In 04,I was a freshman in USTC(University of Science and Technology of China).

You're right about the future "Truth and Reconciliation Commission" stuff and in my opinion,this kind of organization should deal with much more historical events rather than '89 event,such as 1959-1961's big famine,Cultural Revolution and 1950-1953's extreme agrarianize reformation.I hope I could see that day in my life(you can not understand how hopeless about that I am:)).

Froog said...

Yes, I'd certainly like to see more openness in approaching all of these difficult topics in PRC history. But addressing the '89 crackdown is the most pressing issue, I think, because it's the major black mark against the post-Mao regime,and still colours so much of the PRC's policy, both internally and in its relations with other countries.

Moreover, I fear it's getting to be too late to achieve the kind of useful catharsis that the 'truth and reconciliation' process attempts to achieve. Most of the people involved in the events of the 50s and 60s are dead now, or getting very, very old. When I first came to China in the early 90s, a lot of people seemed to feel a compulsion to unburden themselves to me about their experiences during the Cultural Revolution (at that time, most university staff in their 40s had been Red Guards when they were young); but I don't encounter that very much any more. I fear the right historical moment may have passed for trying to clear the air about those tragedies.

Kirby said...

Yes,a disappointed reality.

Froog,could you make a prediction about the future of China? or when will the Communist rule finally reach its end?

Froog said...

BIG question, K. I'll have to think about it.

And I'm not in any hurry to get myself deported.